Spread the love

For those suffering from depression and anxiety, it can be difficult to put your feelings into words. That’s why one photographer decided to turn the camera on himself, to explore how he feels on the inside through a powerful mini-series.

Danny Richardson, 31, has lived with depression, anxiety and insecurity for more than a decade. When it all started, he isn’t really sure.

Describing himself as a “sensitive soul”, Richardson tells HuffPost UK Lifestyle that he puts far too much pressure on himself professionally and has a tendency to over-analyse everything.

Danny has long struggled with his weight and has a history of mental illness in his family, both of which he believes have influenced the way he thinks and behaves.

Now, he has chosen to share three images in a bid to help not only himself but others, too.

“As with all things in life, the only way to make any kind of a difference is to initiate change yourself… no matter how small,” he tells HuffPost UK Lifestyle.

“There is often great stigma attached to the term ‘mental illness’ and if I can in some small way help just one person feel like they are able to speak out then I will be happy.”

For more visit Richardson’s website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

  • ‘In Ruins’
    “This image represents the overwhelming sadness, vulnerability and darkness that absorbs me when I’m low.

    “Despite the beauty of my surroundings it feels like my life is… in ruins.”

  • ‘Hold On, Be Strong’
    “Once more, the sense of vulnerability and the battle against insecurity has led me to create another nude piece.

    “Nude in art is nothing new and I think it may be a theme in this series (if that’s what it becomes)…

    “I hope that like my first image this resonates with those who need it most.

    “Despite our fears and against all odds and challenges we must… hold on, be strong.”

  • ‘Weight Of Expectation’
    “I’ve lost count of the number of times people have said ‘you’re looking a bit skinny’

    “Some of it is ‘friendly banter’, some of it is genuine concern, all of it (once I hear it again and again) begins to wear down on me and adds to my self-consciousness and insecurities..

    “Did this image turn out exactly as I planned? Not exactly… It’s a fair bit darker, slightly more abstract and compositionally not a perfect representation of what I’d intended, but in some twisted way that perfectly encapsulates the other aspect of the concept.

    “Not everything can be perfect… and that’s ok.”

Suggest a correction

Leave a Comment

X